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Where do Amazon Cruises Leave From?

  |   Cruise Tips

Covering almost 40% of South America, the Amazon Rainforest spans over 9 countries on the continent, with 60% lying within Brazil’s borders, 13% in Peru, 10% in Colombia, and small sections in Ecuador, Bolivia, Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana. The best way to experience the natural wonder is by taking a cruise down the Amazon River itself, which possesses the most impressive portions of the entire rainforest. So, where do Amazon cruises leave from? There are several points of entry, it just depends on which sights you want to see!


While you can access the Amazon Rainforest from any of the countries above, the actual Amazon River only runs through Peru, Brazil and Ecuador- all cruises will leave from one of these countries.

Delfin II Amazon Cruise from Peru 

Delfin II Amazon Cruise from Peru 

Amazon Cruises Leaving From Peru

If you plan on taking a cruise in Peru, you’ll have the options of boarding your river cruise in the city of Iquitos or the nearby port town of Nauta.


International flights must go through the capital city of Lima, with many direct flights from North America, one-stop connections from Europe, and two-stop flights from Asia and Australasia. Direct, low cost flights to Lima are easily available from almost every major city in Central or South America. 


Once you reach Lima, you can get a connecting flight to Iquitos, less than a two-hour journey. Those embarking their cruise in Iquitos can be transported directly from the airport to their vessel. 


If you’ll be continuing to Nauta to embark from that point, it can be reached in under two hours in a private car from Iquitos airport, or by speedboat from the port in Iquitos. Small charter planes also fly this route, reaching Nauta in just under an hour and a half. All of our Peru Amazon cruises include transfers from the Iquitos airport to Nauta. 


Those taking a cruise that leaves from Peru will have the opportunity to explore Pacaya-Samira National Park, one of the most bio-diverse, protected areas in the Amazon rainforest.


You can explore our Amazon cruises leaving from Peru here.


Desafio Amazon Cruise from Brazil

Desafio Amazon Cruise from Brazil

Amazon Cruises Leaving From Brazil

Amazon river cruises leave from the cities of Manaus and Santarem in Brazil. Manaus, the capital and largest city of the state of Amazonas, is the most accessible city in the rainforest and most common lift-off point. With direct flights from North America, European flights connecting through Rio de Janeiro or Sao Paulo, two-stop flights from Asia and Australasia, and countless domestic flights, getting to Manaus can be relatively quick and easy.


If you prefer to take one of the cruises that leaves from Santarem, you can easily access it with a one hour and fifteen minute flight from Manaus. With over three flights per day, this is also an easy-to-access spot. 


By taking an Amazon river cruise from Brazil, the opportunities are endless. As stated above, it hosts 60% of the rainforests, so there are plenty of different cruise routes, stops, distances and experiences to suit anyone’s needs. Each route tends to cover multiple ecological zones, with one third of all animal species in the world living here.


You can explore our Amazon cruises leaving from Brazil here.


Anakonda Amazon Cruise from Ecuador

Anakonda Amazon Cruise from Ecuador

Amazon Cruises Leaving From Ecuador

More Amazon river cruises leave from Peru or Brazil, but starting a river cruise in Ecuador is also a great option.


Travelers coming to the Amazon through Ecuador will need to fly first to the capital city of Quito or Guayaquil (the city well-known as the gateway to the Galapagos Islands). Just like the flights to Peru or Brazil, there are many direct flights from major cities in South America, some from southern cities in North America, one-stop flights from Europe, and two-stop flights from Asia and Australasia. 


Once you reach Quito or Guayaquil, you can travel by plane to Coca, where you will depart for your Ecuador Amazon River cruise.  Coca is a city in the Amazon rainforest that is located at the confluence of the Coca River and the Napo River. The flight from Quito is about 30 minutes.


Ecuador is well-loved as a lesser-known cruise route, and is popular for shorter trips (it has the smallest portion of the river). With an equally impressive amount of biodiversity, each part of the Amazon has something to offer. Depending on where you’re coming from, sometimes it is quicker and cheaper to reach the entry points in Ecuador than the other countries, especially if you are already taking a cruise to the Galapagos Islands


You can explore our Amazon cruises leaving from Ecuador here.



Whichever country you plan to visit in the Amazon, there are plenty of ways to get to the points where Amazon cruises leave from: Iquitos, Nauta, Manaus, Santarem or Coca. What’s most important is to pick the route that caters to your needs, and takes you to the sights you hope to see. The Amazon is a country in itself, so you will likely forget which country you entered through as soon as you sail along the alluring waters surrounded by exotic flora and fauna. Speak with any of our travel agents about which route is best for you, by Contacting Us, or browse our tours by country above!

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About Rainforest Cruises

Rainforest Cruises is a boutique travel company specializing in Amazon river cruises and tours, providing you with the finest collection of cruises in Peru, Brazil, Ecuador, the Galapagos Islands and Panama. As South American travel experts we have all the advice you need to help you find and book your dream cruise and an unforgettable adventure of a lifetime.


Geri Daniel loved her vacation with Rainforest Cruises.
We had an absolutely fabulous time on the cruise. Thank you again for the trip of a lifetime.
— Geri Daniel, Austin, TX
The Johannson family encounter a sloth on their rainforest cruise.
We had a wonderful time. We were all impressed with the efficiency and organization of the trip from start to finish.
— Jeanette Johannson & Family, USA